You are here: Home Press Releases I am so chained down by my business to this spot’ Making Money in Jamaica, 1756
Date: Apr 07, 2021

I am so chained down by my business to this spot’ Making Money in Jamaica, 1756 April 12, 2021: Joseph C. Miller Memorial Lecture Series: Lecture by Sheryllynne Haggerty, University of Hull

April 12, 2021: Joseph C. Miller Memorial Lecture Series: Lecture by Sheryllynne Haggerty, University of Hull

Abstract: This paper will consider the various ways in which lesser merchants and traders, ships’ captains, others ‘supporting slavery’, and women, made money, or at least survived in Jamaica, through answering the question, ‘How were lesser merchants, other traders, sailors and women integrated into the local, regional and Atlantic economy?’ The first part of this paper will briefly set the scene in terms of international, regional and inland island trade in 1756, including the slave trade, within the context of a ‘mercantilist’ imperial system. It will also briefly outline the plantation system at this point in time, the importance of sugar vis a vis other commodities such as coffee, cotton, pimentos, and the ‘pens’ [livestock farms] which provided provisions and animals such as cattle, mules and horses. The majority of this paper will then focus on the way in which ordinary people made a living, often precariously, in Jamaica, focussing thematically on: lesser traders, managers and captains; pens and plantations; supporting slavery; and women’s work. All free people, white and of colour, benefitted from the system of slavery within Britain’s empire, but this paper will argue that they did not do so equally.

Document Actions