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Third-Party Funded Projects Connected to the BCDSS and Its Members

In the academic world, third-party funded projects are usually defined as those shares of the financing of specific research projects that do not come from the university's own budget. In a broader sense, third-party funded projects also include extra-budgetary funds that are raised by other institutions.

 

Our Cluster of Excellence is involved in the following kind of projects:

Projects Aquired by BCDSS Members | Projects (Financially) Supported by the BCDSS |

Membership of BCDSS Members in Projects of Other Institutions

 

Projects Aquired by BCDSS Members

DFG Priority Programme Transottomanica

Transottomanica is a priority programme (Schwerpunktprogramm) funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). In it collaborate 15 single research projects as well as a number of associated projects located at 13 universities and research institutions in Germany. In its first phase, the programme will run for three years from 2017–2020. In its second phase, from 2020–2023.

 

Project members during first phase of the project:

Coordinators:
Prof. Dr. Stefan Rohdewald, Speaker
Eastern and Southeastern European History
Leipzig University

Prof. Dr. Stephan Conermann
Institute of Oriental and Asian Studies
Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn

Prof. Dr. Albrecht Fuess
Center for Near and Middle Eastern Studies
Philipps-Universität Marburg

Dr. Florian Riedler, Programme coordinator
Leipzig University

First Phase
Slavery and Loyalty: The Russian and Ottoman Empires

Principal Investigator:
Prof. Dr. Christoph Witzenrath

Researcher:
Stanislav Mohylny, M.A.

First Phase
Slaves of the Black Sea Region in Istanbul: Spatial and Social Mobility in the Seventeenth Century

Researcher:
Dr. Veruschka Wagner

 

Project members during second phase of the project:

Coordinators:
Prof. Dr. Stefan Rohdewald, Speaker
Eastern and Southeastern European History
Leipzig University

Prof. Dr. Stephan Conermann
Institute of Oriental and Asian Studies
Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn

Prof. Dr. Albrecht Fuess
Center for Near and Middle Eastern Studies
Philipps-Universität Marburg

Dr. Florian Riedler, Programme coordinator
Leipzig University

Second Phase
Slaves of the Black Sea Region in Istanbul: Spatial and Social Mobility in the Seventeenth Century

Researcher:
Dr. Veruschka Wagner

Second Phase
Transottoman Semiospheres: Pavel A. Levašev's (died 1820) and Necati Efendi's (died after 1776)
Imaginations of the Other

Principal Investigator:
Prof. Dr. Stephan Conermann

Researchers:
Alexander Bauer, M.A.
NN

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DFG Individual Research Grants

Individual research grants of the German Research Foundation enable scientists and academics who have completed their academic training to conduct at any time research projects with clearly defined topics and durations, regardless of the subject.

 

Atlas zur Sklavereigeschichte der französischen und spanischen Territorien Santo Domingos vom 16. Jahrhundert bis Ende des 18. Jahrhunderts" (Ze 302/25-1)
[Atlas on the history of slavery in the French and Spanish territories of Santo Domingo from the 16th century to the end of the 18th century]

The aim of the project is to develop a thematic atlas on the history of slavery on the entire island of Santo Domingo. In this atlas, a development in time and space of the natural and material structures that are classified as evidence of slavery will be presented. In particular, slave retreat areas and the networks between slaves, runaway slaves and the colonial institutions will be worked out.

Grant holder: Prof. Dr. Michael Zeuske
Member: Dr. Alexa Voss

 

Die Monte Abatone-Nekropole von Cerveteri

The aim of the project is the study of a large cemetery of approximately 100 ha surface (8th century BC–1 century AD) in order to reconstruct the historic and demographic development of the Etruscan metropolis Cerveteri (30 km north of Rome, Italy) with particular regard to its social structure, aspects of dependency and gender differentiation. The methods employed include archaeological survey, geophysical survey, excavation as well as the study of grave goods from old excavations (approximately 300 graves). The Bonn Center for Digital Humanities (BCDH) has been involved since 2020. The first phase of the project runs from 2019–2022.

Grant Holder: Prof. Dr. Martin Bentz
Staff: Dr. Dennis Beck, Christian Briesack M.A., Florian Birkner M.A.

Collaboration with the Università della Campania L. Vanvitelli and the Università della Tuscia, Viterbo.

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General Research Grant Funded by the Gerda Henkel Foundation

Migration and Resettlement in Late Medieval Syria

for excavation, laboratory analysis, and textual analysis

Two phenomena dominate the demographic history of Greater Syria in the medieval era: the contraction of settlements and emigration of populations in the 10th and 11th centuries CE, and the sudden reoccupation of the same places in the 13th and 14th centuries. What appears as a deliberate decision by multiple households, or even entire communities, to return to villages that had not been occupied for centuries, reoccupy their ruins, rebuild houses, and cultivate anew neglected fields is a fascinating chapter in the history of the Middle East that has relevance to the modern world, but has never been systematically investigated.This project aims to return balance to the study of demographic change by shifting the focus from out-migration to return and recovery, and to discover who these people were and what pushed them return to long-abandoned places.

This project aims at understanding this phenomenon through intensive investigation of one rural community in modern Jordan. This season of excavations at Tall Hisban will focus on two clusters of Late Antique farmhouses reoccupied in this period and the contemporary cemetery built in the ruins of a church nearby (excavation combined with isotope analysis of human remains). The project also includes study of period-texts relevant to the identity of small-scale communities, migration, and land use.

Grant Holder: Prof. Dr. Bethany Joelle Walker 

 

General Research Grant Funded by the Max van Berchem Foundation

The Farmhouses and Fields of Medieval Ḥisbān, Jordan: The 2020 Season

for excavation and laboratory analysis

This project includes a single excavation season and post-season analysis of soil samples and finds from two clusters of Mamluk-era farmhouses, combined with survey, excavation, and OSL dating of the relic agricultural terraces in the Wadi Ḥisbān, to investigate the ways the local community organized food production, fair access to natural resources, and communal labor. A robust program of environmental, materials, and textual analysis is planned for the study of household industry, socialization, and community-making.

The combination of digital record-keeping; 3-D modeling of architecture; phytolith, macrobotanical, faunal, starch, and residue analysis; and archaeometry (namely, thin-section petrography, XRD, and XRF of ceramics) will address a range of questions related to cooking practices, resource exchange, and social networks. Beyond confirming the occupational history of these structures, this season aims to address two phenomena in Middle Islamic settlement history for Transjordan and Palestine: the wide-scale reoccupation of abandoned houses, after hundreds of years, in the 13th and 14th centuries, and the struggle for control over natural resources between local communities and imperial powers.

Grant Holder: Prof. Dr. Bethany Joelle Walker 

 

General Research Grant Funded by the German-Israeli Foundation for Scientific Research and Development

The Medieval Jerusalem Hinterland Project: A Multidisciplinary Landscape Study

collaborative excavations at Khirbet Beit Mamzil, hinterland terrace survey, and OSL dating of terrace soils – held jointly with Gideon Avni (Israel Antiquities Authority/Hebrew University)

This is a multi-year, multi-disciplinary study of a late medieval farmstead in its agricultural landscape, and includes three components: the excavation of the site of Khirbet Beit Mazmil in Jerusalem, the excavation and OSL-dating of relic agricultural terraces in the Ein Kerem hinterland, and extensive textual analysis of Mamluk endowment documents and Ottoman tax registers and court records relevant to land use and disputes.

The purpose of the project is to explore the development of Jerusalem's agricultural hinterland during the later medieval period, with an eye to the financial initiatives taken by local communities. The larger perspective is the struggle for control over land and food that defined the rather dependent relationships of small-scale communities vis-á-vis the state.

The project is currently in final publication phase and has been contracted with Equinox Press to produce the monograph Life on the Farm in Late Medieval Jerusalem: The Peasant Farmstead of Khirbet Beit Mazmil, Its Occupants and Their Industry over Five Centuries.

Grant Holder: Prof. Dr. Bethany Joelle Walker 

 

Humboldt Research Fellowship for Experienced Researchers

Anti-vagrancy, Punishment and Labor Relations in the Context of the Abolition of Slavery in the Lusophone World (Rio de Janeiro, Luanda and Lourenço Marques, 1850–1910)
As the research project intends to investigate the connections among anti-vagrancy, punishment and labor relations in the context of the abolition of slavery in the Lusophone world it stands at the crossroads of three fields of scholarship. First, it clearly connects to the broad scholarly conversation about the abolition of slavery and the legislation related to the labor relations. The scholarship on anti-vagrancy policies forms the second field to which the research project connects: Indeed, the anti-vagrancy policy is a common feature of post-abolition contexts. Alessandro Stanziani showed that in the British and French Empires the official abolition of slavery "was followed by extremely coercive rules regarding vagrants, issued in the name of public order and economic growth as an antidote to poverty". Anti-vagrancy policy in these spaces was an example, for Stanziani, that even after the end of slavery the boundary line between freedom and unfreedom was not clear in the world of labor. the third important sphere of this project is the debate about the role of the City Council in the Lusophone world. The City Councils were seen as fundamental structures of colonial society by the historiography.

Host during Humboldt sponsorship: Prof. Dr. Stephan Conermann
Fellow: Prof. Dr. Paulo Cruz Terra

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Projects (Financially) Supported by the BCDSS

Exploring Slave Trade in Asia
Towards an Indian Ocean and Maritime Asia Slave Trade Database

The project Exploring Slave Trade in Asia (ESTA) is a collaboration by the International Institute of Social History, the Bonn Center for Dependency and Slavery Studies, the Linnaeus University and ENS Lyon.

Members: Jeannine Bischoff, M.A.; Dr. Claude Chevaleyre; Prof. Dr. Stephan Conermann

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La Revista Latinoamericana de Trabajo y Trabajadores

The Revista Latinoamericana de Trabajo y Trabajadores (REVLATT) seeks to satisfy the need for a journal focused entirely on the worlds of labor, bringing together research with diverse views and perspectives about and from Latin America.

The journal will approach studies of labor in a broad sense and in the long term (16th to 21st centuries), with the aim to overcome several dichotomies (such as the division between the studies of the "classic" industrial and waged workers and those dedicated to slavery and other forms of coactive work) and explore a variety of socio-economic systems, as well as the diverse non-evolutionary continuum of coactive labor and labor regimes that bring together informal and popular activities.

Contact person: Dr. Christian De Vito

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Membership of BCDSS Members in Projects of Other Institutions

Worlds of Related Coercions in Work

The COST Action "Worlds of Related Coercions in Work" (WORCK) calls for a radical change of perspective in labour history. It links the stories of work and production with those of violence, expropriation and marginalisation.

By studying the persistence and transformations of coercion and bondage across gender orders, geographic regions and historical eras, WORCK shifts the focus of labour history: Neither the male-breadwinner model nor the free wage labourer or the capitalist mode of production can form the blueprint for this new history of WORCK. Instead, a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of coercion in all work relations throughout history is the pivot of this endeavour.

Members: Dr. Claude Chevaleyre; Dr. Christian de Vito; Dr. Hanne Østhus

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